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Singapore harbour congestion! No signs of disruption or temporary congestion in northern China ports!

Karen 2024-06-20 18:05:11

Singapore harbour congestion! No signs of disruption or temporary congestion in northern China ports!

Recently, due to geopolitical conflicts and other factors, many major ports in the world are facing congestion, and shipping prices are soaring, which is bringing unprecedented challenges to foreign trade enterprises and freight forwarders.

The number of container ships waiting to dock in Singapore has surged since May, causing congestion at the port. As a "crossroads" at sea, the Port of Singapore is facing increased demand for refueling and transshipment. Ships were refueling for longer trips and offloading cargoes that had previously been en route to Suez for the Middle East.shipping agent from China to Sigapore


The Maritime and Port Authority of Singapore recently said that this was mainly because of the Red Sea crisis, which caused a large number of ships to divert to the Cape of Good Hope, disrupting the arrival schedule of ships in major ports around the world, resulting in a "ship aggregation" effect.ddp service

It is understood that the Port of Singapore container throughput in 2023 completed 39.01 million TEU, an increase of 4.6%, a record high. Along with the increase in transshipment demand, the port of Singapore handled a total of 16.9 million TEUs in the first five months of this year, climbing nearly 8% from the same period in 2023.sea shipping by LCL
Mr Delury noted that Singapore's container terminal utilisation rate was close to 90 per cent in May, compared with the traditional optimal level of around 70 per cent.
To cope with the congestion, the Port of Singapore has reactivated the old berths and storage yards that were previously dumped at Keppel Terminal, and increased manpower investment in parallel to deal with the pressing issue of container backlogs. And later this year, Singapore's Tuas Port will add three more berths to its existing eight, which will increase overall port handling capacity and ease pressure.